Toxic Chemicals

In pictures: the parasitic bond between water and coal

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 19 March 2014 at 5:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Kemal Jufri / Greenpeace
Coal barges come down the Mahakam river in Samarinda, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo

It’s World Water Day on Saturday and this year’s theme highlights the facts that water is needed to produce nearly all forms of energy and the demand for both is rising.

In pictures: the toxic truth of your children's clothes

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 20 January 2014 at 11:00am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Jeff Lau/Greenpeace
A worker screens a pattern onto children's wear in Huzhou, China

When I look at these shockingly colourful pictures of clothes manufacturing in China, it is a stark reminder that you don’t always know the full story behind the production of your kid's garments.

Toxic chemicals are the little monsters in children's clothing

Posted by Nadia Haiama — 14 January 2014 at 12:07pm - Comments
Burberry bag
All rights reserved. Credit: Emma Stoner / Greenpeace
Clothes from brands like Burberry have been found to contain hazardous chemicals

Today we told the world a story, a story about the little monsters in children's clothes and shoes. As the mother of a young daughter, this is one story I had to read and one that revealed a shocking truth about the clothes we buy for our kids.

Our latest investigation has revealed the presence of hazardous chemicals in clothing made by 12 very well known brands; from the iconic kid's label Disney, to sportswear brands like Adidas, and even top-end luxury labels like Burberry.

Buzz killers: UK blocking bee-killing pesticide ban

Posted by Graham Thompson — 25 April 2013 at 12:47pm - Comments
Bumblebee on a flower
All rights reserved. Credit: Steve Erwood / Greenpeace
You don't have to be Einstein to work here...

In a shock to the scientific community, neonicotinoids, - or neurotoxic agricultural insecticides - have been shown in laboratory tests to cause brain damage in bees.

Actually, it wasn’t that much of a shock. There’s never been any doubt over the potential of these chemicals to harm bees - the recent controversy has been over dosage.

Valentino proves that 'green' is the new 'black'

Posted by Richardg — 8 February 2013 at 2:03pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace International

At the start of November, we threw down the gauntlet to 15 top Italian and French luxury fashion brands. We challenged them to clean up their products by agreeing not to use toxic chemicals and to ensure their leather and packaging wasn't causing deforestation.

The toxic tale behind your clothing

Posted by Yifang Li — 23 November 2012 at 11:40am - Comments
Detox models
All rights reserved. Credit: Lance Lee/Greenpeace
Fashion companies like Zara are using toxic chemicals to make their clothes

What are you wearing today? Touch it. Go on. What does it feel like? Yes, you're touching a piece of clothing. You're touching a type of fabric. You're touching a fashion choice. And yet, there's more to it: You're also touching a story. Because every piece of clothing – in your wardrobe, in my wardrobe, in everyone's wardrobe – has a story.

Marks & Spencer takes toxic chemicals out of clothing

Posted by Martin Besieux — 24 October 2012 at 5:11pm - Comments
Marks & Spencer
All rights reserved. Credit: Emma Stoner/Greenpeace
This isn't just detox, it's M&S detox

Encouraging a fashion behemoth to change the way it produces clothing is no small task. But armed with the facts and the collective power of supporters like you, we are able to achieve the sort of success story we are announcing today.

Which is that Marks & Spencer has committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire supply chain and products by 2020.

C&A and Li-Ning join new road towards toxic-free fashion

Posted by hayley.baker — 23 November 2011 at 11:23am - Comments
Shoppers outside C&A store in Amsterdam
All rights reserved. Credit: Alex Yallop / Greenpeace
Shoppers outside of an Amsterdam C&A store

International fast-fashion retailer C&A has just joined with China’s biggest sportswear company, Li-Ning, and Adidas, Nike, Puma and H&M to launch a Joint Roadmap to begin tackling the fashion industry’s toxic pollution problem.

This year our Detox campaign exposed the direct link between global clothing brands, their suppliers, and toxic water pollution around the world. The Joint Roadmap is an important step forward, and a reminder of what public pressure can achieve.

Tesco must end their pesticide habit

Posted by mollybrooks — 15 November 2011 at 4:10pm - Comments
Presenting a letter to Tesco HQ in Beijing
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Fruit and vegetables sold by Tesco in China carry illegal levels of pesticides

Evan Brooks blogs about Greenpeace East Asia’s investigation into pesticides on Tesco produce.

After three years of independent testing, produce sold at Tesco supermarkets in China continues to show levels of pesticides far above the legal limit. When is Tesco going to wake up and smell the chemically-doused produce?

Big clothing brands like H&M are listening to you

Posted by jamie — 27 October 2011 at 2:55pm - Comments
Greenpeace volunteer talks to a passer-by outside H&M in Stockholm
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace/Ludvig Tillman
Fast results in fast fashion: you persuaded H&M to publish its restricted substances list

Tommy Crawford, communications manager on the Detox campaign, reveals the latest success story in getting clothing brands to ditch toxic chemicals.

As fashion-lovers around the world ponder over which clothes to add to their Christmas wishlists, news about a different list linked to the fashion industry has got the Detox team here buzzing. I’m talking about H&M’s Restricted Substance List, a detailed version of which appeared for the first time on the company’s website this month.

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