Tigers

In pictures: Tiger! Tiger! Protect these magnificent creatures on their International Day!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 27 July 2016 at 1:59pm - Comments

Every year on the 29th July the largest members of the cat family have their special day which raises awareness and celebrates these iconic animals. It’s estimated that fewer than 4,000 tigers are left in the wild with almost 93% of their historic range being lost.<--break->

PHOTOS: In the eye of the tiger, his will to survive on International Tiger Day

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 29 July 2015 at 2:58pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton/Greenpeace
Close-up of a semi-wild Sumatran Tiger (Panthera Tigris Sumatrae), seen at the Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation rescue centre

The largest of the world's big cats, tigers have a special day dedicated to them. 29th July is the purrfect day to raise awareness for endangered tigers and support efforts to conserve these magnificent predators. Take action for tigers >> http://bit.ly/1H2e51M

No more tears for tigers as Johnson & Johnson cleans up its palm oil

Posted by Richardg — 6 May 2014 at 11:21am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: UNKNOWN

On Friday, Johnson & Johnson announced it would stop buying palm oil from companies destroying the rainforest. Now the onus is on the palm oil industry as a whole to leave its forest destruction behind.

Tuna are for life, not just for lunch.

Posted by Willie — 2 May 2014 at 12:00am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Tuna are awesome. We don’t get to say that enough, so since it’s World Tuna Day, I want to make amends. These fish are majestic ocean wanderers, who have earned their place in history, but today they are sadly the icons of global overfishing & dodgy fishing methods, and a globally-traded commodity.

Colgate agrees to stop buying dirty palm oil - but P&G is still dodging the issue

Posted by Richardg — 24 March 2014 at 6:53pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park

Great news: Colgate just agreed to stop buying palm oil from forest destroyers. Not only is this a win for fans of dental hygiene (and let's face it, no one wants orangutan breath) but it leaves Procter & Gamble more isolated than ever.

Head & Shoulders - wipes out more than just dandruff

Posted by Richardg — 26 February 2014 at 2:38pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Head & Shoulders is the best known anti-dandruff shampoo in the world. Yet it has a dirty secret - the company that makes it buys its palm oil from forest destroyers.

The week two pulp and paper companies showed their true colours

Posted by Phil Aikman — 30 January 2014 at 11:58am - Comments

This week Asia Pulp and Paper, the target of a successful Greenpeace campaign, took yet another step along the road to reform. But its competitor APRIL is still clinging to rainforest destruction.

World's largest palm oil trader turns over a new leaf

Posted by Richardg — 6 December 2013 at 6:12pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton
Wilmar has a history of deforestation, but it says those days are now behind it

If there's ever a time for bad puns, it's when the world's largest palm oil trader promises to protect forests. Wilmar International, responsible for almost half of the world's palm oil, will no longer sell oil from companies that are destroying the rainforest. 

APP pulps trees from its own tiger sanctuary. How dumb is that?

Posted by ianduff — 16 December 2011 at 4:04pm - Comments
Forest and peatland clearance inside APP's Senepis tiger sanctuary
All rights reserved. Credit: Eyes on the Forest/WW Indonesia
This was APP's Senepis Tiger Sanctuary, until one of APP's suppliers cut down the trees

Asia Pulp and Paper – the company doing so much to jeopardise the future of Indonesia's rainforests – has done some pretty stupid things in the past. But pulping the trees in its own tiger sanctuary is astonishingly dumb.

And yet that's exactly what APP has done.

I'm the eye of the tiger

Posted by Rusmadya Maharuddin — 22 September 2011 at 5:45pm - Comments
Greenpeace tiger activists encounter a truck carrying logs from a natural forest
All rights reserved. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Greenpeace
Greenpeace tiger activists encounter a truck carrying logs on the first day of the "tiger tour" in Indonesia.

The Sumatran tiger is a graceful and prestigious animal. It’s the ‘King of the Jungle’, a symbol of the richness of the forest, and an inspiration in Indonesian culture. To survive in its forest home the tiger has to run fast and have sharp eyes. But now, the Sumatran tiger’s survival is threatened because that forest is being destroyed.

Syndicate content

Follow Greenpeace UK