plastic bottles

Plastic Pollution - Why Coca-Cola need to take responsibility too

Posted by Louisa Casson — 13 April 2017 at 12:28pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

One of the best things about working on Greenpeace’s campaign to end ocean plastics is the chance to have lots of conversations with all sorts of people about the issue - whether on local radio stations or with pedestrians walking past the 2.5 tonne sculpture we installed outside Coca-Cola’s London HQ this week.

5 Reasons Why We're Outside Coca-Cola's HQ

Posted by Louisa Casson — 9 April 2017 at 7:48pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This morning, we've installed a piece of art right to the doorstep of Coca-Cola’s European office, to hold the soft drinks giant accountable for ocean plastic pollution. 

What soft drink companies are saying

Posted by Louisa Casson — 7 April 2017 at 10:35am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

It’s been three weeks since Greenpeace launched our expose on the gigantic plastic footprint of the soft drinks industry - and their lacklustre action to protect our oceans from the blight of throwaway plastic bottles. 

A brand new plastic bottle every time you feel thirsty?

Posted by Aakash Naik — 14 March 2017 at 6:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

I love fizzy drinks, at the cinema with my snacks, at lunchtime always, at dinner, but never with breakfast, honest….

A love for fizzy drinks should never mean our oceans and the creatures who call it home, have to suffer, but every time we use brand new plastic bottles and don’t recycle them, that’s exactly what’s happening. 

In the UK alone we use 35 million plastic bottles every day, but nearly half of these are not recycled.

Greenpeace report reveals plastic footprint of world’s largest soft drinks companies

Last edited 15 March 2017 at 7:04am
14 March, 2017

Greenpeace UK has conducted the first ever comprehensive survey of the plastic footprints and policies of the top six global soft drinks brands: Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Suntory, Danone, Dr Pepper Snapple and Nestlé.

Despite plastic bottles forming a major source of ocean plastic pollution, the survey results reveal a woeful lack of action by the soft drinks industry to prevent their plastic bottles ending up in our oceans. 

“The results are jaw-dropping,” said Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK. “It’s clear that if we’re going to protect our oceans we need to end the age of throwaway plastic. These companies need to take drastic action now.”

Key findings:

Deposit Return Schemes - what exactly are they?

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 22 February 2017 at 5:50pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

You may have seen the term Deposit Return Scheme batted around lately- but what exactly does it mean?

The way I like to think of it is this - with a DRS, you buy the contents of a bottle (glug glug, delicious smoothie), but only borrow the bottle. The tiny deposit paid on top of the drink is fully refundable once the empty bottle is returned. This bottle can then be recycled or (even better!) reused.

Coca-Cola U-turn on opposition to bottle deposit schemes - Greenpeace comment

Last edited 22 February 2017 at 10:51am
22 February, 2017

Responding to news this morning that Coca-Cola has U-turned on its opposition to bottle deposit return schemes, Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK, said:

‘Following Greenpeace’s investigation into Coca-Cola’s lobbying against bottle deposit schemes, we welcome this change of heart. Deposit schemes, which have growing support amongst the public, politicians and industry, can play a key role in reducing the amount of plastic which ends up in our oceans and in landfill. But with up to 12 million tonnes of plastic entering the sea every year, the bigger challenge which companies need to step up to, especially leading brands like Coke, is drastically reducing their plastic footprint.

New Year's plastic resolution: 5 simple ways to help the ocean.

Posted by Willie — 7 January 2016 at 12:22pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Poldhu Beach Watcher/BBC News

The New Year’s storms have brought a lurid, unmissable reminder to UK beaches, with thousands of bright pink detergent bottles being churned up by the sea. As waves of highly-visible plastic trash hit British beaches, it’s a timely reminder of a much bigger problem: we are turning our oceans into plastic soup. It’s been estimated recently that about EIGHT MILLION TONNES of plastic ends up in the ocean each year.

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