China

In pictures: the toxic truth of your children's clothes

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 20 January 2014 at 11:00am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Jeff Lau/Greenpeace
A worker screens a pattern onto children's wear in Huzhou, China

When I look at these shockingly colourful pictures of clothes manufacturing in China, it is a stark reminder that you don’t always know the full story behind the production of your kid's garments.

Toxic chemicals are the little monsters in children's clothing

Posted by Nadia Haiama — 14 January 2014 at 12:07pm - Comments
Burberry bag
All rights reserved. Credit: Emma Stoner / Greenpeace
Clothes from brands like Burberry have been found to contain hazardous chemicals

Today we told the world a story, a story about the little monsters in children's clothes and shoes. As the mother of a young daughter, this is one story I had to read and one that revealed a shocking truth about the clothes we buy for our kids.

Our latest investigation has revealed the presence of hazardous chemicals in clothing made by 12 very well known brands; from the iconic kid's label Disney, to sportswear brands like Adidas, and even top-end luxury labels like Burberry.

In pictures: Chinese coal giant plunders Inner Mongolia's water resources

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 23 October 2013 at 12:00am - Comments
Local farmer Hu Shan
All rights reserved. Credit: © Bo Qiu / Greenpeace
Local farmer Hu Shan pulls up a dead yang chai bush near Shenhua's Number 8 water well

We’ve had a fantastic, hot summer this year, cooling down with a drink of water whenever needed.

So when I look at Bo Qiu’s photo feature of water shortages in Inner Mongolia it is a strong reminder that easy access to clean water is not a given for everyone.

The toxic tale behind your clothing

Posted by Yifang Li — 23 November 2012 at 11:40am - Comments
Detox models
All rights reserved. Credit: Lance Lee/Greenpeace
Fashion companies like Zara are using toxic chemicals to make their clothes

What are you wearing today? Touch it. Go on. What does it feel like? Yes, you're touching a piece of clothing. You're touching a type of fabric. You're touching a fashion choice. And yet, there's more to it: You're also touching a story. Because every piece of clothing – in your wardrobe, in my wardrobe, in everyone's wardrobe – has a story.

Tesco must end their pesticide habit

Posted by mollybrooks — 15 November 2011 at 4:10pm - Comments
Presenting a letter to Tesco HQ in Beijing
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Fruit and vegetables sold by Tesco in China carry illegal levels of pesticides

Evan Brooks blogs about Greenpeace East Asia’s investigation into pesticides on Tesco produce.

After three years of independent testing, produce sold at Tesco supermarkets in China continues to show levels of pesticides far above the legal limit. When is Tesco going to wake up and smell the chemically-doused produce?

From Chinese Young Pioneer to Greenpeace activist: the story of Tom Wang

Posted by Tom Wang — 28 September 2011 at 10:09am - Comments
Tom Wang, Communications Director of Greenpeace East Asia
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Tom Wang, Communications Director of Greenpeace East Asia

My name is Tom Wang. Tom is my English name. I gave it to myself when I was learning English from my British teacher. She couldn't pronounce my Chinese name, Xiaojun. Xiaojun means "a soldier born at dawn".

Surfing the Detox wave

Posted by Tamara Stark — 26 September 2011 at 2:51pm - Comments

As you’ve heard, we’re now seeing a growing wave of clothing companies committing to eliminate toxic chemicals from their production processes. Four major clothing brands have recently come onboard and we’re certain that more companies – and perhaps other industries – will soon stop using hazardous chemicals that currently contaminate the world’s waterways and environment.

Clickers and stickers make H&M detox

Posted by tracy.frauzel — 20 September 2011 at 10:08am - Comments
Wastewater discharged from a denim washing factory in Xintang, Zengcheng, China
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Wastewater discharged from a denim washing factory in Xintang, Zengcheng, China

Clothing giant H&M has responded to a torrent of tweets, Facebook updates, and Detox sticker actions last week with a public commitment to Detox. Hazardous chemicals are out. Transparency and transformational change are in.

Will H&M make “Detox” the new must-have?

Posted by tracy.frauzel — 13 September 2011 at 10:54am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
70% of China's rivers and lakes are now dangerously polluted: manufacturing industry being the main cause

There's a skeleton in H&M's closet. The fast-fashion retailer sells clothes made with chemicals which cause hazardous water pollution around the world, and the only way to stop this water pollution is to come clean and stop using such chemicals for good. As one of the largest clothing groups in the world, a H&M committed to a toxic-free future would set a trend for the rest of the fashion industry to follow.

Detox hat-trick: Adidas joins Nike and Puma in ditching toxic chemicals

Posted by Eoin D — 31 August 2011 at 11:34am - Comments
Adidas is given the yellow card in Hong Kong for the use of toxic chemicals in t
All rights reserved. Credit: Clement Tang / Greenpeace
Adidas has agreed to play clean and has committed to removing toxic chemicals from its products

Adidas is going toxic-free, the company has just announced!

This is great news for our environment, rivers, and the millions of people in China and elsewhere who depend on rivers for drinking water and agriculture.

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