Rivers

In pictures: A river runs through it. Go with the flow on World Rivers Day

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 25 September 2015 at 3:16pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
Trees and ferns line the Bairaman river and surrounding forest in West Pomio district.

This Sunday people from more than 60 countries celebrate World Rivers Day by taking part in various activities like festivals, river clean ups and habitat restoration to increase public awareness about the many values of rivers and the threats they face.

dirty coal, fossil fuels, divestment, forests, rivers, pollution,climate change

Dirty Laundry 2: Hung Out to Dry

Last edited 12 April 2012 at 12:22pm

Unravelling the toxic trail from pipes to products

Publication - August 23, 2011

Research commissioned by Greenpeace International has revealed that
clothing and certain fabric-based shoes sold internationally
by major clothing brands are manufactured using nonylphenol ethoxylates
(NPEs). NPEs -- which are used as surfactants in textile
production -- subsequently break down to form toxic nonylphenol (NP).
Nonylphenol is a persistent chemical with hormone-disrupting
properties that builds up in the food chain, and is hazardous even at
very low levels. 

 Download the
report - PDF 3.8 MB
(32 pages)
 Download Clothing and the global toxic cycle infographic 300dpi (pdf 2.12 MB)Download
Clothing and the global toxic cycle infographic - 72dpi (
jpg 213
KB)

   The investigation involved the analysis of 78 articles of sports and
recreational clothing and shoes bearing the logos of 15 leading clothing
brands.
Greenpeace is calling on the brands and suppliers identified in this
investigation, and our
previous Dirty Laundry report
, to become champions for a
toxic-free
future
– by eliminating all releases of hazardous chemicals from
their supply chains and their products.   Governments also have a crucial role to play. To this end, Greenpeace
is calling on governments to work towards the elimination of all
releases of hazardous chemicals by adopting a political commitment to 'zero

discharge' of all hazardous chemicals within one generation, based
on the precautionary principle and a preventative approach to chemicals
management.    Download Dirty Laundry 2: Hung Out to Dry >>    Head to greenpeace.org.uk/toxics to find out more about our toxics campaigns.  

Puma overtakes Adidas and Nike in race to drop toxic pollution

Last edited 29 July 2011 at 10:13am

For immediate release, 26th July 2011

29 July, 2011

Puma, the world’s third largest sportswear brand, has responded to a
Greenpeace challenge to ‘detox’, by publicly committing to the
elimination of all releases of hazardous chemicals from its entire
product lifecycle, and across its global supply chain by 2020 (1),
putting it firmly ahead of its competitors Nike and Adidas in the race
for a toxic-free future.

Puma’s move comes less than two weeks after Greenpeace launched its 'Dirty Laundry' report, which identifies commercial links between major clothing brands (2), including Nike, Adidas and Puma, and suppliers responsible for releasing hazardous and hormone-disrupting chemicals into Chinese rivers (3).

Puma leaps ahead of Nike and Adidas in Detox Challenge

Posted by Gemma Freeman — 27 July 2011 at 11:38am - Comments
Activists in Bangkok streaked for an international action of over 600 people in
All rights reserved. Credit: © Athit Perawongmetha / Greenpeace
Activists in Bangkok streaked for an international action of over 600 people in 29 cities in 10 countries

By Eoin from our International office:  Hats off to Puma, the third largest sportswear company in the world, for publicly committing today to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals from its entire product lifecycle and across its whole supply chain by 2020.

From our China team: how to lose a foot on fieldwork

Posted by Louise Edge — 14 July 2011 at 10:52am - Comments
Zhong Yu during the clean-up of the Dalian oil spill
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Zhong Yu during the clean-up of the Dalian oil spill

Zhong Yu has worked for Greenpeace in China for over seven years and has witnessed some of the most devastating environmental disasters there from rapid glacier retreat on the Himalayas, the 2008 Sichuan earthquake to last summer’s devastating Dalian oil spill. Here, she writes about the undercover research behind our latest report, which exposes the terrible impact that China’s growing textile industry is having on the country’s rivers.

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